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Vitamin D May Helps Women Build Muscle After Menopause.

According to a new report, vitamin D supplementation can significantly increase muscle strength and reduce the loss of body muscle mass in women years after menopause. Researchers found older women who received vitamin D supplements experienced a significant increase (+25.3%) in muscle strength, while those receiving a placebo lost an average of 6.8% of their muscle mass during the course of the multi-year study. The study also revealed that those who did not receive vitamin D supplements were nearly two times more likely to experience a fall. Dr. Wulf H. Utian, the Executive Director of The North American Menopause Society adds, "While this study is unlikely to decide the debate over Vitamin D, it provides further evidence to support the use of vitamin D supplements by postmenopausal women in an effort to reduce frailty and an increased risk of falling."
The North American Menopause Society, September 2015

What's Your Resting Heart Rate?

Even if you’re not an athlete, knowing your heart rate can help you keep tabs on your fitness level. A normal resting heart rate for adults ranges from 60 to 100 beats a minute. Generally, a lower heart rate at rest implies more efficient heart function and better cardiovascular fitness.
American Heart Association, October 2015

Manual Therapies for Cancer Radiation Patients?

Radiation therapy for neck and head cancers can often result in neck pain and loss of motion. A small study involving five participants suggests that the use of manual therapies, treatments commonly performed by doctors of chiropractic, can help reduce pain and improve mobility in this class of patients without adverse outcomes.
Clinical Otolaryngology, September 2015

Antibiotic-Resistant 'Superbug' an Emerging Threat.

Health officials from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warn antibiotic-resistant bacteria are on the rise in some major American cities. CRE, or Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, are a class of common bacteria that have become resistant to some of the most widely used antibiotics. According to the CDC, experts have recorded higher-than-expected levels of this bacteria in Atlanta, Baltimore, and New York. Most CRE infections occur in hospitals, but officials from the CDC are worried that havoc could ensue if CRE starts to become transmitted outside of healthcare settings since enterobacteriaceae are so common.
Journal of the American Medical Association, October 2015

Early Chiropractic Care Prevents Chronic Pain

Research from 2000 and 2003 found that auto injury patients who got early treatment focused on mobilizing the injured area recovered faster and had fewer residual symptoms from the crash. Chiropractic does this: a chiropractic adjustment gets the joints in your spine moving the way they’re supposed to, helping to prevent chronic pain.